Archive for the ‘BIS’ Category


Nov

18

Friday Grab Bag


Posted by at 4:41 pm on November 18, 2016
Category: BISIran SanctionsOFACSyria

Grab BagHere are a few recent developments that you may have missed:

  • The House voted yesterday to nullify the impact of a license granted by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) in September which would allow Boeing to sell civil aircraft to Iran.
  • On Tuesday the House passed a bill to extend the Iran Sanctions Act for another 10 years. The bill, weighing in at around 50 words, makes no changes to the Act beyond extending its expiration date.
  • The Caesar Syria Civilian Protection Act of 2016 was passed by the House on Wednesday. Named after the alias of a military photographer who has taken pictures of the conflict in Syria, the act would require blocking of foreign persons, including presumably the Russians, who provide “significant” support to the Government of Syria or the Central Bank of Syria. It will be interesting to see how this plays out if the new Administration carries out its apparent desire to cooperate with Russia in Syria. Although Russia is fighting ISIS there, it is also supporting the current Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad.
  • The temporary general license granted by the Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) to permit exports to ZTE notwithstanding its inclusion on the Entity Listwas extended by BIS today until February 27, 2017. ZTE was put on the Entity List after it diverted U.S.-origin goods to Iran.
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Copyright © 2016 Clif Burns. All Rights Reserved.
(No republication, syndication or use permitted without my consent.)

Nov

17

Guilty As Charged


Posted by at 8:59 pm on November 17, 2016
Category: BISChinaNorth Korea Sanctions

Fat Man and Little Boy via KCNA [Fair Use]Oh dear. Apparently His Rotundity, the Dear Leader of North Korea, is annoyed that people that he can’t throw into internment camps and execute are mentioning that his aspirations to become a triathelete have been sabotaged by third and fourth helpings of yangnyeom tongdak. The chief offenders appear to be Internauts in China that refer to Kim Jong Un as Jin San Pang which, apparently, translates as — snicker, snicker — Kim Fatty the Third.

This blog, following the long-standing tradition of ridiculing the appearance of national enemies, has been on the forefront of suggesting that the Nork Dictator might benefit by a few less cigarettes and a few more jogs around the Chosŏn’gŭl: 55호 관저, his main palace. But we haven’t gone quite as far as Jin San Pang. Even with our post titled Fat Man Sanctioned Over Little Boy

Jin San Pang, aka His Obesity Kim Jong Un, has asked China to censor the use of Jin San Pang on Chinese websites. In the grand tradition of the Chinese government, they have both completely censored the offensive, if accurate, nickname Jin San Pang, at the same time that they have denied censoring the name and expressed shock and profound disappointment that anyone would dare to suggest that they would tamper with free speech on the Internet.

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Copyright © 2016 Clif Burns. All Rights Reserved.
(No republication, syndication or use permitted without my consent.)

Nov

4

Sometimes Once Doesn’t Mean Once


Posted by at 9:20 am on November 4, 2016
Category: BISEncryption

Blue Hour Capitol Building
My dog Maisie shamelessly plugging the historic Cubs victory in the 2016 World Series

This blog previously reported on the recent changes to the encryption rules.   One less-than-carefully drafted provision in those amendments has been causing some confusion relating to the annual self-classification reports

The issue is whether an item once listed on a self-classification report needs to be relisted on subsequent reports.  Before the recent amendments, products needed to be relisted on subsequent reports for each year in which they were exported during the time frame covered by the classification report.

The new rules say this:

Your encryption self-classification report must include the information described in paragraph (a) of Supplement No. 8 to part 742 for each applicable encryption commodity, software and component made eligible for export or reexport under § 740.17(b)(1) of the EAR. Each product must be included in a report only one time. However, if no new products are made eligible for export or reexport during a calendar year, you must send an email to the addresses listed in paragraph (e)(3)(ii)(A) of this section stating that nothing has changed since the previous report.

At least one law firm has, with some justification, read the language saying that a product must be “included in a report only one time” to mean that items need not be included in subsequent annual reports unless, presumably, the encryption functionality of the item has changed.

At the BIS Update 2016, BIS officials made clear that they do not think that the language means what it appears to say. Instead, they asserted, items needed to be included on subsequent annual self-classification report even if encryption funtionality of the item has not changed since the last report. Apparently the language is thought by the agency to mean that you only have to list an item once on the same report, although why anyone ever thought that they would have to list any product more than once on the same report is puzzling.

No one from the agency, however, at least that I heard, could explain what “becomes eligible for export” means. The reporting requirement in the previous version was for items “exported or reexported pursuant to an encryption registration.” Unfortunately this new language requiring the listing in the report of every encryption item “eligible for export” during the reporting period would appear to apply to every encryption item that the company filing the report might have been able to export during the reporting period.  This would be the case whether or not it was actually exported. The safest course, then, for upcoming self-classification reports is to include every item with encryption functionality that was available for sale during the reporting period.

Note: My apologies for the picture of my dog wearing a Cubs hat.  However, there’s this:  (a) the Cubs victory justifies all actions by longtime Cubs fans that are not otherwise illegal, immoral or rude and (b) a dog picture is the only possible way to make a post about BIS’s encryption rules even vaguely interesting.

Photo Credit: Go Cubs Go! by Clif Burns, via www.clifburns.net. Copyright 2016 Clif Burns

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Oct

27

The Kremlin’s Janitor: New Sanctions on Russia Pose Dilemma for U.S.


Posted by at 10:35 pm on October 27, 2016
Category: BISOFACRussia Sanctions

Kremlin.ru [CC-BY-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commonshttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AVladimir_Putin_at_the_Millennium_Summit_6-8_September_2000-19.jpgAs the U.S. considers more sanctions on Russia, given its cybershenanigans and its involvement in Syria on behalf of Bashar al-Assad, it is running into some unexpected difficulties. The quote of the week, from this article, explains part of the issue:

“While the president has full sanction authority, there’s nobody left to sanction in Russia besides the janitor in the Kremlin,” said Michael Kofman, a global fellow at the Wilson Center’s Kennan Institute in Washington. “In terms of expanding any kind of commercial or financial sanctions, we’re basically maxed out.”

While that is probably an exaggeration, it is not far from the truth. What that means is that individually targeted sanctions are becoming less effective, forcing a consideration of sector-based sanctions, which lead to their own problems in terms of collateral consequences. For example, the sanctions on Rosboronexport had to be revised because it prevented Afghanistan from getting parts for the Mi-17 helicopters that it uses.

Other possible sanctions would impact our allies as well as Putin and his cronies. Options such as preventing U.S. bank from buying ruble-based bonds, cutting off Russia from the SWIFT transfer system, or an embargo on energy exports, would each hurt Europe as much as Russia. Europe gets almost of one-third of energy from Russia.

This illustrates the problem of economic sanctions in a global economy. It’s one thing to whack an economically isolated country. You could cut Granada off from the world economy and the biggest impact would be that your holiday eggnog would have to go nutmeg-less. But for developed or developing economies that are largely integrated into the world economy, economic sanctions will have undesired and unintended effects.

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Copyright © 2016 Clif Burns. All Rights Reserved.
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Oct

14

North Pole Praises Today’s OFAC Actions


Posted by at 4:27 pm on October 14, 2016
Category: BISCuba SanctionsOFAC

Santa Flanked by F-16

The following just arrived in my email:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
MEDIA CONTACT: Elf E. McElfface, eemcelfface@gmail.com or (951) 262-3062

Santa’s Village, North Pole – Santa Claus today, on behalf of himself, Mrs. Claus and the 40,000 elfployees of the Santa Foundation, expressed his gratitude to the Office of Foreign Assets Control for its timely revision of its rules to grant Santa clear authority this year to visit children both in the United States and Cuba. For years, Santa’s efforts to bring holiday cheer to children of both countries has been thwarted by section 515.207 of the Cuba regulations which would prohibit Santa’s sleigh from landing in the United States while toys for Cuban children remained in the sleigh or in landing in the United States if those toys had been delivered to Cuban children first.

Today’s action waives these restrictions if Santa’s sleigh only carries items that would, if they were subject to the EAR, be EAR99 or controlled only for AT reasons. This ends the long struggle over whether teddy bears and other toys — which are not food, medicine, or personal communications devices — could only be delivered to Cuban children in wrapped parcels with the child’s name and address written on the outside and with the statement “GIFT—Export License Not Required” also marked on the parcel package. Notwithstanding the diligence and timely efforts of Santa’s elfployees, compliance with these requirements for each non-naughty child in Cuba has heretofore been impossible.

News of the OFAC announcement led to loud cheers and applause throughout Santa’s Village. Elf E. McElfface, Santa’s spokeself, wiped a tear of joy from his eye as he said to the elves in one of Santa’s workshops that he never believed that this would occur in his lifetime, which was saying a lot given that the average life expectancy of an elf on the North Pole is currently just over 500 years.

As Christmas approaches, Santa said that he was looking forward to this year’s delivery of toys and goodies to the nice children throughout the world more than ever before and reminded children everywhere, both in Cuba and the United States, that they could call his hotline at +1 (951) 262-3062 to leave their Christmas wishes and toy requests.

This press release may include predictions, estimates or other information that might be considered forward-looking. While these forward-looking statements represent the Santa Foundation’s current judgment on what the future holds, they are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which reflect our opinions only as of the date of this press release. Please keep in mind that we are not obligating ourselves to revise or publicly release the results of any revision to these forward-looking statements in light of new information or future events.

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Copyright © 2016 Clif Burns. All Rights Reserved.
(No republication, syndication or use permitted without my consent.)